Semcoglas, Germany

Reference - Europe

Semcoglas uses insulating glass with thermoplastic spacers


When Semcoglas added the German Aschaffenburg location to its Company Group in October 2003, the production facility only had an old glass cutting facility and a small insulating glass line at its disposal. Since the start of this year, Semcoglas has now been working with an ultra-modern Bystronic glass production line for the manufacture of insulating glass which uses glass supplied by a rapid HEGLA insulating glass feed system.

The new insulating glass line measures 64 metres in length and processes glass sizes ranging from 19 x 35 centimetres up to 2.70 x 5.00 metres. In doing so, the production is completely focused on the current and future requirements of the insulating glass customers.

The Company Group produces insulating glass in 15 of the 20 branches and has used Bystronic glass production lines for many years – mostly including the tps’applicator for the processing of thermoplastic spacers. “We made the conscious decision to invest in this future-oriented technology as it is one of the most advanced warm edge technologies on the market: The thermoplastic edge bond simultaneously replaces a conventional metallic spacer, the desiccant and the primary seal”, explains Michel Schüller, Technical Branch Manager in Aschaffenburg and son of the Managing Partner of the Semcoglas Group, Hermann Schüller. He goes on to explain: “As a result, the thermal bridges found at the edge of the insulating glass are considerably reduced compared to the conventional spacers, thus improving the internal temperature.”

“The use of thermoplastic spacers is of particular benefit when producing triple insulating glass units as both spacers are automatically applied without any offset whatsoever – even when dealing with shaped formats. As a result, we are able to achieve better quality even in terms of visual appearance. Semcoglas customers also appreciate this”

www.semcoglas.com

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